A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers Penguin Classics

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Penguin Classics #ad - Thoreau interweaves descriptions of natural phenomena, the Native American and Puritian histories of New England, and local characters with digressions on literature and philosophy, the Bhagavad Gita, the imperfections of Christianity, the rural landscape, and many other subjects. Although it shares many of the themes in Thoreau's classic Walden,  A Week on the Concord offers an alternative perspective on his analaysis of the relationship between nature and culture.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. Thoreau's account of his 1839 boat trip is a finely crafted tapestry of travel writing, essays, and lyrical poetry. With more than 1, 700 titles, penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines.

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers Penguin Classics #ad - Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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Cape Cod

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Digireads.com #ad - Based on several trips to the cape and originally published as a series of articles, Henry David Thoreau's "Cape Cod" is a remarkable work that depicts the natural beauty of Cape Cod and the nature that surrounds it. Any lover of nature or of cape Cod in general will delight in this captivating depiction of the area in the early to mid 1800s.

. Thoreau, a consummate lover of the outdoors and nature is right at home in the Cape and he details his excitement of the area with naturalist portraits of the indigenous species and animals.

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Henry David Thoreau: A Life

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University of Chicago Press #ad - What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos.

Walden. And, running through it all, who, Thoreau the passionate naturalist, long before the age of environmentalism, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him. The thoreau i sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one, ” says Walls. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part.

Henry David Thoreau: A Life #ad - Yesterday I came here to live. That entry from the journal of henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. The result is a thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.

 . His attempt to “live deliberately” in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854. But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond.

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The Journal of Henry David Thoreau, 1837-1861 New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - Yet at roughly seven thousand pages, or two million words, it remains Thoreau’s least-known work. This reader’s edition, rhythms, is the first to capture the scope, the largest one-volume edition of Thoreau’s Journal ever published, and variety of the work as a whole. Ranging freely over the world at large, the Journal is no less devoted to the life within.

As thoreau says, “it is in vain to write on the seasons unless you have the seasons in you. ”. Henry david thoreau’s journal was his life’s work: the daily practice of writing that accompanied his daily walks, the revolving seasons, the workshop where he developed his books and essays, and a project in its own right—one of the most intensive explorations ever made of the everyday environment, and the changing self.

The Journal of Henry David Thoreau, 1837-1861 New York Review Books Classics #ad - It is a treasure trove of some of the finest prose in English and, for those acquainted with it, its prismatic pages exercise a hypnotic fascination.

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American Transcendentalism: A History

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Hill and Wang #ad - The first comprehensive history of transcendentalismamerican Transcendentalism is a comprehensive narrative history of America's first group of public intellectuals, the men and women who defined American literature and indelibly marked American reform in the decades before and following the America Civil War.

Along with their early inheritance from European Romanticism, America's transcendentalists abandoned their interest in general humanitarian reform. The transcendentalists would painfully bifurcate over what could be attained and how, the other by Orestes Brownson, and Theodore Parker, George Ripley, one half epitomized by Ralph Waldo Emerson and stressing self-reliant individualism, emphasizing commitment to the larger social good.

By the 1850s, the uniquely American problem of slavery dissolved differences as transcendentalists turned ever more exclusively to abolition. Philip F. By war's end, transcendentalism had become identified exclusively with Emersonian self-reliance, congruent with the national ethos of political liberalism and market capitalism.

American Transcendentalism: A History #ad - Gura masterfully traces their intellectual genealogy to transatlantic religious and philosophical ideas, and quixotic attempts to improve, illustrating how these informed the fierce local theological debates that, gave rise to practical, so often first in Massachusetts and eventually throughout America, personal, even perfect the world.

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Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things a John Hope Franklin Center Book

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Duke University Press Books #ad - Bennett argues that political theory needs to do a better job of recognizing the active participation of nonhuman forces in events. Along the way, bergson, nietzsche, including attempts by kant, and deleuze, adorno, Darwin, Thoreau, she engages with the concepts and claims of Spinoza, disclosing a long history of thinking about vibrant matter in Western philosophy, and the embryologist Hans Driesch to name the “vital force” inherent in material forms.

Bennett explores how political analyses of public events might change were we to acknowledge that agency always emerges as the effect of ad hoc configurations of human and nonhuman forces. Bennett concludes by sketching the contours of a “green materialist” ecophilosophy. She reflects on the vital power of material formations such as landfills, which generate lively streams of chemicals, and omega-3 fatty acids, which can transform brain chemistry and mood.

Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things a John Hope Franklin Center Book #ad - She suggests that recognizing that agency is distributed this way, might spur the cultivation of a more responsible, and is not solely the province of humans, ecologically sound politics: a politics less devoted to blaming and condemning individuals than to discerning the web of forces affecting situations and events.

Bennett examines the political and theoretical implications of vital materialism through extended discussions of commonplace things and physical phenomena including stem cells, metal, fish oils, electricity, and trash. Toward that end, she theorizes a “vital materiality” that runs through and across bodies, both human and nonhuman.

In vibrant matter the political theorist Jane Bennett, ethics, renowned for her work on nature, and affect, shifts her focus from the human experience of things to things themselves.

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Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp Volumes I & II 1856

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#ad - Although it enjoyed better initial sales than her previous, and more famous, novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, it was ultimately less popular. The best hiding places were found on high ground in swampy areas. It was first published in two volumes by Phillips, Sampson and Company in 1856. Dred can thus be placed within an african-american literary tradition as well as a political revision of the sentimental novel see David Walker's Appeal 1829 and Frederick Douglass's The Heroic Slave 1852.

The response to Stowe's first work greatly impacted her second anti-slavery novel. This book published in 1856 has been reformatted for the KIndle and may contain an occasional defect from the original publication or from the reformatting. Dred: a tale of the great dismal Swamp is the second popular novel from American author Harriet Beecher Stowe.

The novel is also interesting in the historical context of runaway slave communities surviving for a long time in swamp areas. Dred, the titular character, escaped slaves living in the Great Dismal Swamp, is one of the Great Dismal Swamp maroons, preaching angry and violent retribution for the evils of slavery and rescuing escapees from the dog of the slavecatchers.

Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp Volumes I & II 1856 #ad - Uncle tom's cabin drew criticism from abolitionists and African-American authors for the passive martyrdom of Uncle Tom and endorsement of colonization as the solution to slavery. Dred, by contrast, introduces a black revolutionary character who is presented as an heir to the American revolution rather than a problem to be expatriated.

Swamps were places where runaway slaves could hide, and therefore became a taboo subject, particularly in the south.

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Walking

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Enhanced Media Publishing #ad - In walking, henry david thoreau talks about the importance of nature to mankind, mentally, and spiritually, physically, and how people cannot survive without nature, yet we seem to be spending more and more time entrenched by society. For thoreau walking is a self-reflective spiritual act that occurs only when you are away from society, that allows you to learn about who you are, and find other aspects of yourself that have been chipped away by society.

This new 2017 edition of Thoreau’s celebrated essay includes an introduction by historian Elbert Hubbard.

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The Boatman: Henry David Theoreau's River Years

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Harvard University Press #ad - The boatman and backyard naturalist was keenly aware of the way humans had altered the waterways and meadows of his beloved Concord River Valley. Yet he sought out for solace and pleasure those river sites most dramatically altered by human invention and intervention—for better and worse. Robert thorson gives readers a Thoreau for the Anthropocene.

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Thoreau and the Language of Trees

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University of California Press #ad - Included are one hundred excerpts from Thoreau’s writings about trees, paired with over sixty of the author’s photographs. His lively essays show that trees were a thread connecting all parts of Thoreau’s being—heart, mind, and spirit. Trees were central to henry david Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, his work as a naturalist, his thought, and his inner life.

In this original book, richard higgins explores thoreau’s deep connections to trees: his keen perception of them, the joy they gave him, the poetry he saw in them, his philosophical view of them, and how they fed his soul. Thoreau’s words are as vivid now as they were in 1890, when an English naturalist wrote that he was unusually able to “to preserve the flashing forest colors in unfading light.

Thoreau and the Language of Trees #ad - Thoreau and the language of Trees shows that Thoreau, with uncanny foresight, believed trees were essential to the preservation of the world. In short, he spoke their language. His portraits of them were so perfect, it was as if he could see the sap flowing beneath their bark. When thoreau wrote that the poet loves the pine tree as his own shadow in the air, he was speaking about himself.

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Walden AmazonClassics Edition

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AmazonClassics #ad - A celebration of personal renewal through self-reliance, composed for all of us living in “quiet desperation, independence, and simplicity, ” Walden is eternal. Revised edition: previously published as Walden, this edition of Walden AmazonClassics Edition includes editorial revisions. By removing himself from the distractions of materialism, Thoreau hoped to not only improve his spiritual life but also gain a better understanding of society through solitary introspection.

In walden, two-month, two-day stay into a single year, Thoreau condenses his two-year, using the four seasons to symbolize human development—a cycle of life shared by both nature and man. At walden pond, henry David Thoreau reflected on simpler living in the natural world.

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