Second Edition Princeton Studies in International History and Politics Book 149 – States and Power in Africa: Comparative Lessons in Authority and Control

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Princeton University Press #ad - The final chapter on policy prescriptions has also been revised to reflect the evolution of African and international responses to state failure. Theories of international relations, assumed to be universally applicable, have failed to explain the creation of states in Africa. There, the interaction of power and space is dramatically different from what occurred in Europe.

In states and power in africa, Jeffrey Herbst places the African state-building process in a truly comparative perspective. Herbst's bold contention—that the conditions now facing African state-builders existed long before European penetration of the continent—is sure to provoke controversy, for it runs counter to the prevailing assumption that colonialism changed everything.

Second Edition Princeton Studies in International History and Politics Book 149 - States and Power in Africa: Comparative Lessons in Authority and Control #ad - This revised edition includes a new preface in which the author links the enormous changes that have taken place in Africa over the past fifteen years to long-term state consolidation.

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The Bright Continent: Breaking Rules & Making Change in Modern Africa

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Mariner Books #ad - She found what cable news ignores: a continent of ambitious reformers and young social entrepreneurs driven by kanju—creativity born of African difficulty. Dayo olopade knew from personal experience that Western news reports on conflict, disease, and poverty obscure the true story of modern Africa. And so she crossed sub-Saharan Africa to document how ordinary people deal with their daily challenges.

It’s a trait found in pioneers like Kenneth Nnebue, who turned cheap VHS tapes into the multimillion-dollar film industry Nollywood. An upbeat study of development in Africa .  .  . The book is written more in wonder at African ingenuity than in anger at foreign incomprehension. The new yorker   “A hopeful narrative about a continent on the rise.

The Bright Continent: Breaking Rules & Making Change in Modern Africa #ad - The new york times Book Review  . For anyone who wants to understand how the African economy really works, The Bright Continent is a good place to start” Reuters. A shining counterpoint to conventional wisdom, The Bright Continent rewrites Africa’s challenges as opportunities to innovate, and celebrates a history of doing more with less as a powerful model for the rest of the world.

Or ushahidi, a technology collective that crowdsources citizen activism and disaster relief.

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It's Our Turn to Eat: The Story of a Kenyan Whistle-Blower

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HarperCollins e-books #ad - A fast-paced political thriller. On a deeper and much richer level, the book is an analysis of how and why Kenya descended into political violence. Washington post called "urgent and important” by harper's magazine, It’s Our Turn to Eat is a nonfiction political thriller of modern Kenya—an eye-opening account of tribal rivalries, pervasive graft, and the rising anger of a prospect-less youth that exemplifies an African dilemma.

Wrong's gripping, thoughtful book stands as both a tribute to Githongo's courage and a cautionary tale. New york times book review “on one level, It’s Our Turn to Eat reads like a John Le Carré novel.

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Markets and States in Tropical Africa: The Political Basis of Agricultural Policies

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University of California Press #ad - In this edition, bates provides a new preface and chapter that address the seeds of Africa’s recovery and discuss the significance of the continent’s success for the arguments of this classic work. Following independence, most countries in Africa sought to develop, but their governments pursued policies that actually undermined their rural economies.

Robert H. Bates’s analysis now faces a challenge, however: the revival of economic growth on the continent. Examining the origins of africa’s "growth tragedy, " Markets and States in Tropical Africa has for decades shaped the thinking of practitioners and scholars alike.

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Democratic Capitalism at the Crossroads: Technological Change and the Future of Politics

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Princeton University Press #ad - Boix shows how growing wages, declining inequality, and an expanding middle class enabled democratic capitalism to flourish. He begins in nineteenth-century Manchester, where factory owners employed unskilled laborers at low wages, generating rampant inequality and a restrictive electoral franchise. An incisive history of the changing relationship between democracy and capitalismThe twentieth century witnessed the triumph of democratic capitalism in the industrialized West, with widespread popular support for both free markets and representative elections.

Today, jobs are going offshore, the information revolution that began in Silicon Valley in the 1970s is benefitting the highly educated at the expense of the traditional working class, and inequality has risen sharply, however, making many wonder whether democracy and capitalism are still compatible.

Democratic Capitalism at the Crossroads: Technological Change and the Future of Politics #ad - Essential reading for these uncertain times, Democratic Capitalism at the Crossroads proposes sensible policy solutions that can help harness the unruly forces of capitalism to preserve democracy and meet the challenges that lie ahead. Today, that political consensus appears to be breaking down, disrupted by polarization and income inequality, widespread dissatisfaction with democratic institutions, and insurgent populism.

He then moves to detroit in the early 1900s, where the invention of the modern assembly line shifted labor demand to skilled blue-collar workers. Tracing the history of democratic capitalism over the past two centuries, Carles Boix explains how we got here—and where we could be headed. Boix looks at three defining stages of capitalism, structure of production and employment, each originating in a distinct time and place with its unique political challenges, and relationship with democracy.

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Democracy in Africa: Successes, Failures, and the Struggle for Political Reform New Approaches to African History Book 9

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Cambridge University Press #ad - Beginning in the colonial period with the introduction of multi-party elections and ending in 2013 with the collapse of democracy in Mali and South Sudan, the book describes the rise of authoritarian states in the 1970s; the attempts of trade unions and some religious groups to check the abuse of power in the 1980s; the remarkable return of multiparty politics in the 1990s; and finally, the tragic tendency for elections to exacerbate corruption and violence.

Nic cheeseman grapples with some of the most important questions facing Africa and democracy today, including whether international actors should try and promote democracy abroad, how to design political systems that manage ethnic diversity, and why democratic governments often make bad policy decisions.

Democracy in Africa: Successes, Failures, and the Struggle for Political Reform New Approaches to African History Book 9 #ad - . This book provides the first comprehensive overview of the history of democracy in Africa and explains why the continent's democratic experiments have so often failed, as well as how they could succeed.

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The Postcolonial State in Africa: Fifty Years of Independence, 1960-2010 Africa and the Diaspora: History, Politics, Culture

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University of Wisconsin Press #ad - Students and scholars of African politics alike will benefit immensely from and enjoy reading The Postcolonial State in Africa. Political science quarterly“the study of african politics will continue to be enriched if practitioners pay homage to the erudition and the nobility of spirit that has anchored the engagement of this most esteemed doyen of Africanists with the continent.

African history review“the book’s strongest attribute is the careful way that comparative political theory is woven into historical storytelling throughout the text. The book is sprinkled with anecdotes from his vast experience in Africa and that of his many students, and quotations from all of the relevant literature published over the past five decades.

The Postcolonial State in Africa: Fifty Years of Independence, 1960-2010 Africa and the Diaspora: History, Politics, Culture #ad - In the postcolonial state in africa, crawford Young offers an informed and authoritative comparative overview of fifty years of African independence, drawing on his decades of research and first-hand experience on the African continent. Young identifies three cycles of hope and disappointment common to many of the african states including those in North Africa over the last half-century: initial euphoria at independence in the 1960s followed by disillusionment with a lapse into single-party autocracies and military rule; a period of renewed confidence, radicalization, and ambitious state expansion in the 1970s preceding state crisis and even failure in the disastrous 1980s; and a phase of reborn optimism during the continental wave of democratization beginning around 1990

. He explores in depth the many african civil wars—especially those since 1990—and three key tracks of identity: Africanism, territorial nationalism, and ethnicity. Only more recently, with some leading to liberalization and others to political, social, have the paths of the fifty-three African states begun to diverge more dramatically, Young argues, and economic collapse—outcomes impossible to predict at the outset of independence.

This book is the best volume to date on the politics of the last 50 years of African independence.

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Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the Legacy of Late Colonialism Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History

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Princeton University Press #ad - Many writers have understood colonial rule as either "direct" French or "indirect" British, with a third variant--apartheid--as exceptional. In analyzing the obstacles to democratization in post- independence Africa, Mahmood Mamdani offers a bold, insightful account of colonialism's legacy--a bifurcated power that mediated racial domination through tribally organized local authorities, reproducing racial identity in citizens and ethnic identity in subjects.

By tapping authoritarian possibilities in culture, and by giving culture an authoritarian bent, indirect rule decentralized despotism set the pace for Africa; the French followed suit by changing from direct to indirect administration, while apartheid emerged relatively later. The result is a groundbreaking reassessment of colonial rule in Africa and its enduring aftereffects.

. Reforming a power that institutionally enforces tension between town and country, and between ethnicities, is the key challenge for anyone interested in democratic reform in Africa. Through case studies of rural uganda and urban South Africa resistance movements, we learn how these institutional features fragment resistance and how states tend to play off reform in one sector against repression in the other.

Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the Legacy of Late Colonialism Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History #ad - Apartheid, mamdani shows, was actually the generic form of the colonial state in Africa. While direct rule denied rights to subjects on racial grounds, indirect rule incorporated them into a "customary" mode of rule, with state-appointed Native Authorities defining custom. This benign terminology, Mamdani shows, masks the fact that these were actually variants of a despotism.

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Contemporary Security Issues in Africa Praeger Security International

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Praeger #ad - It details the impact of complex challenges in Africa and explains why addressing them grows increasingly important. Acknowledges principal terms, offering an integrated appraisal of how and why these issues impact one another while considering developments, which should prove useful in a range of courses on topics including security studies, comparative politics, and African history• Examines linkages between various security issues, trends, underlying concepts, and specific case studies in an exploratory overview of contemporary security issues in Africa• Emphasizes the international and regional security threats caused by contemporary security issues in Africa as a continent as well as in the context of individual countries• Employs a case study methodology, international relations, military history, and future prospects .

This compelling book serves as a comprehensive resource for readers interested in contemporary security issues in Africa.

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When Things Fell Apart: State Failure in Late-Century Africa Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics

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Cambridge University Press #ad - This book covers a wide range of territory by drawing on materials from Rwanda, Liberia, Sudan, and Congo. In so doing, he not only plumbs the depths of the continent's late-century tragedy, but also the logic of political order and the foundations of the state. In when things Fell Apart, Robert H. Bates advances an exploration of state failure in Africa.

In the later decades of the twentieth century, Africa plunged into political chaos. States failed, governments became predators, and citizens took up arms. A must-read for scholars and policy makers concerned with political conflict and state failure.

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Electoral Politics in Africa since 1990: Continuity in Change

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Cambridge University Press #ad - This book is the first comprehensive comparative analysis of the key issues, actors, and trends in these elections over the last quarter century. The book asks: what motivates african citizens to vote? what issues do candidates campaign on? how has the turn to regular elections promoted greater democracy? Has regular electoral competition made a difference for the welfare of citizens? The authors argue that regular elections have both caused significant changes in African politics and been influenced in turn by a rapidly changing continent - even if few of the political systems that now convene elections can be considered democratic, and even if many old features of African politics persist.

Between 1990 and 2015, several hundred competitive legislative and presidential elections were held in all but a handful of the region's countries. Democratic transitions in the early 1990s introduced a sea change in Sub-Saharan African politics.

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